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Excessive sweating in babies

Excessive sweating in babies

Question:

- I have a baby of three and a half months and recently I noticed that his palms and soles sweat more during the day I thought maybe he is too agitated and sweat all over his body but he has palms and soles more moistened and I don't think it would be like it's alive. I am a little worried and would like to tell me if there is a problem and what I can do. Thank you.

Answer:



Hyperhidrosis is the term that defines excessive sweating. Sweating is a physiological process of the body, having an important role in thermoregulation (regulating body temperature) and eliminating toxic products.
It is secreted by some glands in the skin, called sweat glands; these are present everywhere in the skin, being in greater numbers in certain areas: palms, soles, forehead, axillary area and genital area.
The process of sweating is regulated by nervous, endocrine and metabolic mechanisms, depending on the temperature of the environment, the health of the body and not least of the psychological factors.
Thus, in both adult and child hyperhidrosis can occur under various conditions, some physiological and other pathological:

  • high outdoor environment temperature, inadequate clothing, intense physical activity or in inadequate climatic conditions
  • stress, emotions, state of mental agitation, fatigue
  • fever during acute infections, chronic infections (tuberculosis) or other febrile diseases (rheumatic, hematological, leukemias, neoplasms, etc.)
  • endocrine or metabolic imbalances: hyperthyroidism, rickets in children, diabetes, hypoglycemia, intoxication, etc.
  • it can accompany various acute pain syndromes: kidney colic, biliary colic, angina pectoris etc.
  • may appear localized in dermatological infections.
    There are also cases where an exact cause of this excessive sweating cannot be detected, cases that are attributed to some neuro-vegetative disorders.
    In the case of a 3-month-old baby, a more abundant sweating in the palms and soles may occur due to the immaturity of the thermoregulatory processes in infants, to them being accommodated at higher temperatures becoming more difficult, but it may also be a state of hypoglycemia, an infectious, hematological disease, etc.
    Make sure that the temperature in the room is not too high, that the clothing is adequate (avoid synthetic fibers), that the baby is well hydrated and nourished and report this aspect to the pediatrician during the periodic check.
    Alina Pop-Began
    - Resident physician - Anesthesia and Intensive Care -
    Specialist details