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The baby jumping festival

The baby jumping festival

In the tradition of the Spaniards to weave religious rituals with pagan and popular elements, the Festival of jumping over babies is also included. This ritual, practiced year by year in the Spanish town of Castrillo de Murcia, within the Corpus Christi Catholic Festival, is not the only one of its kind. Between May 26-30, throughout Spain, besides religious processions, there are a series of events, from plays wrapped in mystery to popular celebrations with the same features.

In the tradition of the Spaniards to weave religious rituals with pagan and popular elements, the Festival of jumping over babies is also included. This ritual, practiced year by year in the Spanish town of Castrillo de Murcia, within the Corpus Christi Catholic Festival, is not the only one of its kind. Between May 26-30, throughout Spain, besides religious processions, there are a series of events, from plays wrapped in mystery to popular celebrations with the same features.
The ritual of jumping over babies, organized to open the Festival, is probably the strangest of these events.
The Baby-Jumping Colacho Festival was organized in the town of Castrillo de Murcia for the first time in 1620, when the locals watched as some men throughout the country made jumps over the babies who were sleeping peacefully in their baskets.

Moreover, the men were dressed in devils, wore whips and whips and made inhuman sounds. It is said that men in such costume perform this ritual to purify the souls of children born in that year. No child from Castrillo de Murcia escapes El Colacho, otherwise he is not considered a Christian in the true sense of the word.
Brother Santísimo Sacramento de Minerva, responsible for organizing the event, carefully monitors the activity of the devils throughout the day. When El Colacho is finished (it takes place at sunrise), the devils start in the city and whip everything that comes their way.
The origins of the custom are vague, but no one is disturbed by this, as long as an evening of pomine is spent in traditional Spanish style.
(Rompres)